Concert Vault

The Lowest Pair

Daytrotter Studio (Rock Island, IL)

Dec 12, 2013

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  1. 1 Welcome to Daytrotter 00:07
  2. 2 Oh Susanna 03:43
  3. 3 Pear Tree 03:02
  4. 4 Rosie 05:05
  5. 5 Living Is Dying 03:10
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Liner Notes

Something I already knew but heard on a throw-away television program the other night was that the great thing about people is that they're going to make a lot of mistakes and they're usually going to have plenty of opportunities to make up for them. The ability to make amends is certainly the most important difference between us and all the other animals out there. We can offer and receive forgiveness. The music of The Lowest Pair is filled with characters who are held to the light and stretched as long as they can stretch so that their toes are held to the flames. Sometimes they they get lucky. More times than not they get lucky, even if it's not all they wanted. These people have learned their lessons, or so they think. Kendl Winter and Palmer T. Lee write about living and dying the way you'd write about waiting for a cake to bake. The people who do it in their songs are painted with a melancholy light and faded colors, knowing that everyone's straddling the same fence and it might be nice to just enjoy the scenery.

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More The Lowest Pair

Something I already knew but heard on a throw-away television program the other night was that the great thing about people is that they're going to make a lot of mistakes and they're usually going to have plenty of opportunities to make up for them. The ability to make amends is certainly the most important difference between us and all the other animals out there. We can offer and receive forgiveness. The music of The Lowest Pair is filled with characters who are held to the light and stretched as long as they can stretch so that their toes are held to the flames. Sometimes they they get lucky. More times than not they get lucky, even if it's not all they wanted. These people have learned their lessons, or so they think. Kendl Winter and Palmer T. Lee write about living and dying the way you'd write about waiting for a cake to bake. The people who do it in their songs are painted with a melancholy light and faded colors, knowing that everyone's straddling the same fence and it might be nice to just enjoy the scenery.