Concert Vault

Steve Gibbons

Apr 30, 1976

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  1. 1 Tupelo Mississippi Flash 05:24
  2. 2 Take Me Home 05:49
  3. 3 Dick Malone 12:35
  4. 4 Rollin' 06:53
  5. 5 Little Queenie 12:10
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Liner Notes

Steve Gibbons - vocals; Trevor Burton - bass, vocals; Dave Carroll - guitar; Bob Wilson - guitar, keyboards, vocals; Bob Lamb - drums

The Steve Gibbons Band only made a few albums in the U.S., and enjoyed their greatest popularity between 1976 and 1978. They had been discovered by The Who's bassist John Entwistle, and he signed them to The Who's label that was distributed by MCA Records in the U.S.

Gibbons is a no-nonsense rocker that some have called the U.K.'s answer to Bob Seger. He had assembled a cool little band that included Trevor Burton, the bassist for the Move. This recording made for the King Biscuit Flower Hour Radio Concert Series and, unfortunately, features only five songs. The recording was taken from a full length set, however - during which some songs clocked in at around 10-minutes each.

Shortly after recording this show, Gibbons would write and record his Down in the Bunker album, which went on to receive a significant amount of critical acclaim. He became an important act in his native U.K., but his career never quite took off in the U.S. - not that he didn't have more than a few chances. He opened for The Who in America and got considerable backing from MCA while trying to break his Any Road album, yet failed to capitalize. By the 1990s, Gibbons career had been pretty reduced to being a cult, club act in England. Still, Gibbons soldiered on, and in 1998 released what many regard as an accomplished tribute to Bob Dylan.

This set, while short, gives a good glance into the type of act Gibbons had while touring in the U.S. during the late 1970s. Highlights include "Tupelo Mississippi Flash," "Take Me Home," and a lively version of Chuck Berry's "Little Queenie" (also covered by The Rolling Stones on Get Yer Ya Yas Out).

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More Steve Gibbons

Steve Gibbons - vocals; Trevor Burton - bass, vocals; Dave Carroll - guitar; Bob Wilson - guitar, keyboards, vocals; Bob Lamb - drums

The Steve Gibbons Band only made a few albums in the U.S., and enjoyed their greatest popularity between 1976 and 1978. They had been discovered by The Who's bassist John Entwistle, and he signed them to The Who's label that was distributed by MCA Records in the U.S.

Gibbons is a no-nonsense rocker that some have called the U.K.'s answer to Bob Seger. He had assembled a cool little band that included Trevor Burton, the bassist for the Move. This recording made for the King Biscuit Flower Hour Radio Concert Series and, unfortunately, features only five songs. The recording was taken from a full length set, however - during which some songs clocked in at around 10-minutes each.

Shortly after recording this show, Gibbons would write and record his Down in the Bunker album, which went on to receive a significant amount of critical acclaim. He became an important act in his native U.K., but his career never quite took off in the U.S. - not that he didn't have more than a few chances. He opened for The Who in America and got considerable backing from MCA while trying to break his Any Road album, yet failed to capitalize. By the 1990s, Gibbons career had been pretty reduced to being a cult, club act in England. Still, Gibbons soldiered on, and in 1998 released what many regard as an accomplished tribute to Bob Dylan.

This set, while short, gives a good glance into the type of act Gibbons had while touring in the U.S. during the late 1970s. Highlights include "Tupelo Mississippi Flash," "Take Me Home," and a lively version of Chuck Berry's "Little Queenie" (also covered by The Rolling Stones on Get Yer Ya Yas Out).