Concert Vault

Rasputina

Daytrotter Studio (Rock Island, IL)

Jul 17, 2007

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  1. 1 Bookery Reading 03:50
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Liner Notes

An activity that could keep someone occupied for days is imaging how Melora Creager of Rasputina's residence is decorated. The array of spooky to quirky to bizarre to fascinating, right back to the oddball, would be impressive, to say the least. I see taxidermy. I see torture devices, live game birds living in the bread basket, thimbles, voodoo dolls, books about spontaneous combustion and the kickers, to throw you off the scent - a bottle of Vitamin Water and a "Devil Wears Prada" DVD. The band's new record is called Oh Perilous World and when talking about modern-day danger (which they don't all that often), what's scarier than the unseen future? Not too much, so the record tells tales from the 1800s - the year without a summer in which Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein -- and Athens circa the 600s through cellos and meticulous detailing that undeniably proves someone's been reading books. Creager here turns her attention Draconian law practices to the dicey accounts of a Mysterious Monkey Man allegedly spotted in India not all that long ago. Possessing green lights for eyes and metal claws, this monkey man was reported upon in an Orson Welles way in the BBC News Online in mid-May 2001. The monkey man supposedly gave monkeys a bad name. - Sean Moeller

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An activity that could keep someone occupied for days is imaging how Melora Creager of Rasputina's residence is decorated. The array of spooky to quirky to bizarre to fascinating, right back to the oddball, would be impressive, to say the least. I see taxidermy. I see torture devices, live game birds living in the bread basket, thimbles, voodoo dolls, books about spontaneous combustion and the kickers, to throw you off the scent - a bottle of Vitamin Water and a "Devil Wears Prada" DVD. The band's new record is called Oh Perilous World and when talking about modern-day danger (which they don't all that often), what's scarier than the unseen future? Not too much, so the record tells tales from the 1800s - the year without a summer in which Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein -- and Athens circa the 600s through cellos and meticulous detailing that undeniably proves someone's been reading books. Creager here turns her attention Draconian law practices to the dicey accounts of a Mysterious Monkey Man allegedly spotted in India not all that long ago. Possessing green lights for eyes and metal claws, this monkey man was reported upon in an Orson Welles way in the BBC News Online in mid-May 2001. The monkey man supposedly gave monkeys a bad name. - Sean Moeller