Concert Vault

Woody Guthrie Tunes

By: Concert Vault

18 songs / 1:03:16

  1. 1 Ramblin' Jack Elliott / Talking Dust Bowl Blues 03:36
  2. 2 The Byrds / Pretty Boy Floyd 02:31
  3. 3 Ry Cooder / Vigilante Man 05:06
  4. 4 David Cohen / Ramblin' Round 03:40
  5. 5 Wilco / Hesitating Beauty 02:58
  6. 6 The Rolling Thunder Revue / Grand Coulee Dam 03:39
  7. 7 Grateful Dead / Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad 05:28
  8. 8 Joan Baez / Deportee (Plane Wreck At Los Gatos) 04:53
  9. 9 Vern and Ray / Pictures From Life's Other Side 05:16
  10. 10 Sam Hinton / Pastures Of Plenty 02:17
  11. 11 Hedy West / Gypsy Davy 02:49
  12. 12 Wilco / California Stars 05:18
  13. 13 The Rolling Thunder Revue / Muleskinner Blues (Incomplete) 02:11
  14. 14 Barbara Dane / I've Got To Know 04:40
  15. 15 Bonnie Prince Billy / Goodbye Dear Old Stepstone 03:02
  16. 16 Loudon Wainwright III / I Am The Way (New York Town) 03:26
  17. 17 Justin Townes Earle / Introduction 00:21
  18. 18 Justin Townes Earle / I Don't Care 02:05
Description
His life was full of tragic happenings, but Guthrie was always ready to let it go and move on to the next thing. His personal optimism, intellectual skepticism, and lyrical brilliance made him an American icon. He could praise the country ("Grand Coulee Dam" was written in the employ of the US government) equally as well as he could point out injustices ("Vigilante Man" and "Deportee" are scathing attacks on the treatment of migrant workers). Guthrie's songs embody an era, but they have lost none of their freshness, especially when the lyrics have been recently re-written (Loudon Wainwright's "I Am the Way") or the music was written to accompany his words just a few years ago (Wilco/Billy Bragg).
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His life was full of tragic happenings, but Guthrie was always ready to let it go and move on to the next thing. His personal optimism, intellectual skepticism, and lyrical brilliance made him an American icon. He could praise the country ("Grand Coulee Dam" was written in the employ of the US government) equally as well as he could point out injustices ("Vigilante Man" and "Deportee" are scathing attacks on the treatment of migrant workers). Guthrie's songs embody an era, but they have lost none of their freshness, especially when the lyrics have been recently re-written (Loudon Wainwright's "I Am the Way") or the music was written to accompany his words just a few years ago (Wilco/Billy Bragg).