Concert Vault

Joe Pass Blues Guitar Seminar

By: Brashwad

7 songs / 1:02:00

  1. 1 Joe Pass / Things Ain't What They Used To Be 11:09
  2. 2 Joe Pass / Do Nothing 'Til You Hear From Me 07:49
  3. 3 Joe Pass / I Can't Get Started 06:36
  4. 4 Joe Pass / Stompin' at the Savoy 09:19
  5. 5 Joe Pass / St. Louis Blues 10:19
  6. 6 Joe Pass / 'Round Midnight 11:23
  7. 7 Joe Pass / Lush Life 05:25
Description
All wannabe blues guitarists, uh, make that guitarists of any stripe, should listen to, and study, some Joe Pass, make that LOTS OF Joe Pass and study hard, indeed, not only don't do nothin' 'til you've heard from Joe, don't even try to play no blues 'til you've learned at least the first two tunes in this list by heart. Joe Pass was quite the guitar teacher, published instruction books, etc. Google: Joe Pass guitar instruction books, lessons...and you can track down his books as well as some good videos. Of course, check out Joe on Youtube; his most popular video there is "All the Things You Are", and is a good display of his style and presence. The first couple of times Joe played GAMH, he was besieged by young guitarists asking for lessons. There was no way he could accommodate them all individually, so we started doing Joe Pass Guitar Seminars around his gigs, Joe giving a lesson to the masses all at once, usually on Saturday and Sunday afternoons, and GAMH would be jammed for about 3 hours with some 400 guitarists from miles around, at $20 a head, a high ticket price in the 70s and 80s, but Joe was regularly paid a lot more for individual lessons of just an hour or so. Tickets for the evening concerts were $6 and the joint was packed with ordinary fans, but the real cognoscenti came to the seminars as well, all the local jazz and blues guitarists, pros as well as wannabes, guitar makers, shop owners, collectors, and many of the local rock royalty, too, Jerry Garcia for example. From listening to Joe's GAMH concerts here on The Vault, you can well imagine that most of the seminar proceedings were ad-libbed. Joe took lots of requests to demonstrate this and that, there were lots of questions and answers, and the scene was interactive in that some brave souls brought their own guitars and even ventured on stage to play along with Joe when he noticed they had guitars and invited them up. I have a distinct memory of a guitarless Garcia lurking in trepidation in the shadows at the back of the room.
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All wannabe blues guitarists, uh, make that guitarists of any stripe, should listen to, and study, some Joe Pass, make that LOTS OF Joe Pass and study hard, indeed, not only don't do nothin' 'til you've heard from Joe, don't even try to play no blues 'til you've learned at least the first two tunes in this list by heart.

Joe Pass was quite the guitar teacher, published instruction books, etc. Google: Joe Pass guitar instruction books, lessons...and you can track down his books as well as some good videos. Of course, check out Joe on Youtube; his most popular video there is "All the Things You Are", and is a good display of his style and presence.

The first couple of times Joe played GAMH, he was besieged by young guitarists asking for lessons. There was no way he could accommodate them all individually, so we started doing Joe Pass Guitar Seminars around his gigs, Joe giving a lesson to the masses all at once, usually on Saturday and Sunday afternoons, and GAMH would be jammed for about 3 hours with some 400 guitarists from miles around, at $20 a head, a high ticket price in the 70s and 80s, but Joe was regularly paid a lot more for individual lessons of just an hour or so. Tickets for the evening concerts were $6 and the joint was packed with ordinary fans, but the real cognoscenti came to the seminars as well, all the local jazz and blues guitarists, pros as well as wannabes, guitar makers, shop owners, collectors, and many of the local rock royalty, too, Jerry Garcia for example.

From listening to Joe's GAMH concerts here on The Vault, you can well imagine that most of the seminar proceedings were ad-libbed. Joe took lots of requests to demonstrate this and that, there were lots of questions and answers, and the scene was interactive in that some brave souls brought their own guitars and even ventured on stage to play along with Joe when he noticed they had guitars and invited them up. I have a distinct memory of a guitarless Garcia lurking in trepidation in the shadows at the back of the room.