Concert Vault

Moe Bandy

Longhorn Ballroom (Dallas, TX)

Oct 29, 1983

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  1. 1 Columbus Stockade 02:14
  2. 2 Bandy the Rodeo Clown 03:45
  3. 3 Here I Am Drunk Again 03:41
  4. 4 Home In San Antone 02:22
  5. 5 Yesterday Once More 03:01
  6. 6 Mind Your Own Business 02:44
  7. 7 Barstool Mountain / I Cheated Me Right Out Of You / Cowboys Ain't Supposed To Cry / She Loves The Devil Out Of Me / Soft Lights And Hard Country Music / Champ 08:15
  8. 8 Band Instrumental 04:37
  9. 9 You're Gonna Lose Her Like That 02:33
  10. 10 I Still Love You In The Same Ol' Way 02:50
  11. 11 She's Not Really Cheating (She's Just Getting Even) 03:01
  12. 12 Let's Get Over Them Together 03:39
  13. 13 Someday Soon 03:03
  14. 14 It's A Cheating Situation / Rodeo Romeo 05:22
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Liner Notes

Moe Bandy - vocals, guitar; Billy Bowers - bass, background vocals; John Clark - fiddle, rhythm guitar, background vocals; J.T. Corenflos - guitar; David Davis - synthesizer; Tommy Detamore - steel guitar, background vocals; John Garshnick - guitar, saxophone; David Rosson - guitar; Joe Stampley - vocals

While singing one of his classics during this near-flawless performance, "I Still Love Her in The Same Old Way," Moe Bandy smoothly delivers the line: "It's over, for the record… so, I let the record play / And I still love you, in the same old way." Country songs have always brought the wittiest double entendres to popular music, and Moe Bandy's are some of the best. One of the biggest names in country during the 1970s, Bandy has released dozens of albums on his own and with his partner, Joe Stampley. This show, which also included Stampley on the bill, was given at the 25th Anniversary celebration of the legendary Dallas honky tonk, the Longhorn Ballroom.

Bandy had just recorded and released an album of Hank Williams covers, which explains the fact that he dips into that musical well more than once during this show. Most of the material, however, is taken from his radio hits, which at this point had spanned nearly a decade.

Born in Mississippi, Bandy and his family had relocated to Texas in 1950, when he was only six years old. It was there he became a fan of the Grand Ole Opry and began soaking in a healthy diet of country, country-swing, bluegrass, and blues. His grandfather was a Texas railroad man, who was actually the boss of legendary country singer, Jimmy Rodgers, known in the 1920s and '30s as "The Singing Brakeman."

In his teens he took up music and played on occasion with his father's part time country band, the Mission City Playboys, but at 16 he moved from an interest in music to a fascination in the sport of rodeo riding. He became a champion bull and buck rider, which he did while still attending high school. By 1962, he was 18 and, tired of getting bruised and fractured, he gave up rough riding to focus on music again.

He chipped at a career in the Texas honky tonks, releasing his songs on small indie labels, while holding down a day job cutting sheet metal. During the late-1960s, he was able to get his group a slot as the house band for Texas-based TV show, Country Corner. It was there that he met and backed most of the bigger names in country music.

Eventually that led to a deal with GRP Records, where he scored his first national hit, "Bandy The Rodeo Clown." After three LPs with GRP, he was signed to Columbia Records, where he scored over a dozen Top 10 hits, both on his own and with future musical duet partner, Joe Stampley.

This show, recorded for the Silver Eagle Cross Country Radio Concert series, includes excellent versions of his best loved material including "Columbus Stockade," "Bandy the Rodeo Clown," "Home In San Antone," and a greatest hits medley containing "Barstool Mountain" and "I Cheated Me Right Out Of You." Among the Hank Williams Sr classics performed here are" "Mind Your Own Business," and "Your Cheatin' Heart."

Not to be missed if you are a traditional country music fan.

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Moe Bandy - vocals, guitar; Billy Bowers - bass, background vocals; John Clark - fiddle, rhythm guitar, background vocals; J.T. Corenflos - guitar; David Davis - synthesizer; Tommy Detamore - steel guitar, background vocals; John Garshnick - guitar, saxophone; David Rosson - guitar; Joe Stampley - vocals

While singing one of his classics during this near-flawless performance, "I Still Love Her in The Same Old Way," Moe Bandy smoothly delivers the line: "It's over, for the record… so, I let the record play / And I still love you, in the same old way." Country songs have always brought the wittiest double entendres to popular music, and Moe Bandy's are some of the best. One of the biggest names in country during the 1970s, Bandy has released dozens of albums on his own and with his partner, Joe Stampley. This show, which also included Stampley on the bill, was given at the 25th Anniversary celebration of the legendary Dallas honky tonk, the Longhorn Ballroom.

Bandy had just recorded and released an album of Hank Williams covers, which explains the fact that he dips into that musical well more than once during this show. Most of the material, however, is taken from his radio hits, which at this point had spanned nearly a decade.

Born in Mississippi, Bandy and his family had relocated to Texas in 1950, when he was only six years old. It was there he became a fan of the Grand Ole Opry and began soaking in a healthy diet of country, country-swing, bluegrass, and blues. His grandfather was a Texas railroad man, who was actually the boss of legendary country singer, Jimmy Rodgers, known in the 1920s and '30s as "The Singing Brakeman."

In his teens he took up music and played on occasion with his father's part time country band, the Mission City Playboys, but at 16 he moved from an interest in music to a fascination in the sport of rodeo riding. He became a champion bull and buck rider, which he did while still attending high school. By 1962, he was 18 and, tired of getting bruised and fractured, he gave up rough riding to focus on music again.

He chipped at a career in the Texas honky tonks, releasing his songs on small indie labels, while holding down a day job cutting sheet metal. During the late-1960s, he was able to get his group a slot as the house band for Texas-based TV show, Country Corner. It was there that he met and backed most of the bigger names in country music.

Eventually that led to a deal with GRP Records, where he scored his first national hit, "Bandy The Rodeo Clown." After three LPs with GRP, he was signed to Columbia Records, where he scored over a dozen Top 10 hits, both on his own and with future musical duet partner, Joe Stampley.

This show, recorded for the Silver Eagle Cross Country Radio Concert series, includes excellent versions of his best loved material including "Columbus Stockade," "Bandy the Rodeo Clown," "Home In San Antone," and a greatest hits medley containing "Barstool Mountain" and "I Cheated Me Right Out Of You." Among the Hank Williams Sr classics performed here are" "Mind Your Own Business," and "Your Cheatin' Heart."

Not to be missed if you are a traditional country music fan.