Lowpines

2KHz (London, England)

Feb 18, 2013

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  1. 1 Welcome to Daytrotter 00:07
  2. 2 Give Me A Horse 05:04
  3. 3 Hold Me In The River 03:11
  4. 4 Heavy Hander 02:38
  5. 5 The Liar's Daughter 03:22
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"Give Me A Horse," by the London-based group Lowpines, is a bath. It's a tub full of water that is made very warm to start with and as the soak goes along, you're forced to remember and live off of those warmer temperatures as you've had to grow accustomed to the more lukewarm and fading ones that you're currently feeling envelope you. You could drain some of the offending bath water out from the bottom and recalibrate for the heat loss with some new water, but more often than not - if you even choose to take a bath - you're just going to let the vanishing of comfort take place, before finally removing yourself from the cold water, drying off and putting some kind of clothing on. You will choose to exhaust every last semblance of why you got into that water in the first place.

The Lowpines take this song and this opportunity to create a sense of loss as it's tolerated, as we live with it, even when we know that we don't have to, even when we're sure that we could just leave it behind. The loss that pops up in this excellent song, by a band that slips into some of the wonderful stylings of The Low Anthem and other such apothecaries, those who find their own kind of healing in the sad examples of where love takes us. Within this one song, we hear pain and bliss and they're masquerading as one another - or being asked to by those wracked most by the effects of them. The main dealer in these conflicting sentiments is the man asking for the horse. It's a horse that is wanted to two potential reasons.

One sounds as if it is for a gift, when he sings, "Give me a horse and I'll keep him strong/For you to ride upon," but the other is more of a silent desire. It's one in which we think it will be his mode of escape. He sings, "Forget me now, my touch is cold/And you think of me as dead and gone/If you think of me at all," and when he's satisfied that these aren't just words, but true emotions, he might just hop upon that muscular beast and ride off into his broken sunset, attempting to get somewhere that's going to feel better. It could be anything that makes him feel better, but at the end of it, that horse is still meant for someone else.

Lowpines Official Site