Concert Vault

Joan Armatrading

Odeon Leeds (Leeds, England)

Nov 17, 1977

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  1. 1 Down To Zero 04:57
  2. 2 Never Is Too Late 06:12
  3. 3 Woncha Come On Home 03:00
  4. 4 Peace In Mind 03:59
  5. 5 Back To The Night 04:56
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Liner Notes

Joan Armatrading - vocals, acoustic guitar
Brian Garfalo - bass
Quitman Dennis - lyricon
David Kemper - drums
Jerry Donahue - electric guitar
Red Young - keyboards

This show at the Odeon in Leeds was recorded on Joan Armatrading's triumphant 1977 U.K. tour where she was promoting her Show Some Emotion LP, the record that also broke her in the U.S. on FM and college radio.

Although this is only a partial set of the entire show, the material recorded here for the King Biscuit Flower Hour is special nonetheless. "Down To Zero," "Never Is Too Late," "Woncha Come On Home," "Peace In Mind," and "Back To The Night" were from her first three albums, when many feel she had written her best material. Although not a dynamic performer, Armatrading was a pro at her craft. Her voice is astounding, especially on "Down To Zero" and "Peace In Mind."

Joan Armatrading was born in Basseterre, Saint Kitts, in the West Indies, in 1950, and moved to Birmingham, England with her family at the age of eight. Upon graduation from school, she took a factory job where they made engineering tools. She was eventually fired because she would perform for her co-workers during tea breaks, which they felt slowed down the factory's productivity. Armatrading soon landed a role in the London production of Hair and eventually started focusing on singing and songwriting. Another Hair cast member, Pam Nestor, began writing material and signed a deal with the indie Cube Records in 1972.

The label, not convinced Nestor had star quality, released it as a "Joan Armatrading" record, which immediately caused the break up of the duo and caused a rift between Armatrading and Cube Records. She was inactive as a recording artist until 1975, when she was signed to A&M Records in the U.K., and began working with famed producers Pete Gage and Glyn Johns.

Within two years, she would be a big star in the U.K. and a rising folk-rock singer/ songwriter in the U.S. Today, she works mostly in Europe and has recently released an all blues-oriented record.

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More Joan Armatrading

Joan Armatrading - vocals, acoustic guitar
Brian Garfalo - bass
Quitman Dennis - lyricon
David Kemper - drums
Jerry Donahue - electric guitar
Red Young - keyboards

This show at the Odeon in Leeds was recorded on Joan Armatrading's triumphant 1977 U.K. tour where she was promoting her Show Some Emotion LP, the record that also broke her in the U.S. on FM and college radio.

Although this is only a partial set of the entire show, the material recorded here for the King Biscuit Flower Hour is special nonetheless. "Down To Zero," "Never Is Too Late," "Woncha Come On Home," "Peace In Mind," and "Back To The Night" were from her first three albums, when many feel she had written her best material. Although not a dynamic performer, Armatrading was a pro at her craft. Her voice is astounding, especially on "Down To Zero" and "Peace In Mind."

Joan Armatrading was born in Basseterre, Saint Kitts, in the West Indies, in 1950, and moved to Birmingham, England with her family at the age of eight. Upon graduation from school, she took a factory job where they made engineering tools. She was eventually fired because she would perform for her co-workers during tea breaks, which they felt slowed down the factory's productivity. Armatrading soon landed a role in the London production of Hair and eventually started focusing on singing and songwriting. Another Hair cast member, Pam Nestor, began writing material and signed a deal with the indie Cube Records in 1972.

The label, not convinced Nestor had star quality, released it as a "Joan Armatrading" record, which immediately caused the break up of the duo and caused a rift between Armatrading and Cube Records. She was inactive as a recording artist until 1975, when she was signed to A&M Records in the U.K., and began working with famed producers Pete Gage and Glyn Johns.

Within two years, she would be a big star in the U.K. and a rising folk-rock singer/ songwriter in the U.S. Today, she works mostly in Europe and has recently released an all blues-oriented record.