Concert Vault

Garland Jeffreys

Shrine Mosque (Springfield, MO)

Apr 6, 1973

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  1. 1 Ballad Of Me 03:32
  2. 2 Banter 00:24
  3. 3 True To Me 02:51
  4. 4 Harlem Bound 05:35
  5. 5 Banter 00:18
  6. 6 She Didn't Lie 06:42
  7. 7 Banter 00:26
  8. 8 James Dean 03:30
  9. 9 Banter 00:17
  10. 10 Just Like Pavlov's Dog 03:21
  11. 11 Banter 00:35
  12. 12 Going Back To The Ozarks 04:11
  13. 13 Bound To Get Ahead Some Day 04:34
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Liner Notes

Garland Jeffreys -vocals, acoustic guitar; Alan Freedman - acoustic guitar

Garland Jeffreys has always defied categorizations. Tackling socially conscious themes since his career began as leader of Grinder's Switch in the late 1960s, Jeffreys has embraced a broad range of musical styles. As a lyricist, Jeffrey's urban poetry often explored racial issues, rebellion and the darker side of life, with its roots in New York City, not unlike his contemporary and more famous friend, Lou Reed.

Jeffreys issued his first self-titled solo album in 1973. Presented here is a rare live recording from right around that time, when Jeffreys opened for Lou Reed as was journeying out into America's heartland with the groundbreaking "Transformer" material.

Not surprisingly, this set places an emphasis on material from Jeffreys' debut album and his compelling voice, songwriting craft and natural charisma rapidly win over Reed's audience. Following the fourth song, Jeffreys is so comfortable that he veers off, treating listeners to a succession of songs not part of his standard repertoire of the time, including "James Dean," "Just Like Pavlov's Dog" and a lovely reading of "Going Back To The Ozarks," an unreleased song dating back to his Grinder's Switch era. Much of his best work was still yet to come, but this remarkable recording is a fine example of Garland Jeffreys at the dawn of his solo career.

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More Garland Jeffreys

Garland Jeffreys -vocals, acoustic guitar; Alan Freedman - acoustic guitar

Garland Jeffreys has always defied categorizations. Tackling socially conscious themes since his career began as leader of Grinder's Switch in the late 1960s, Jeffreys has embraced a broad range of musical styles. As a lyricist, Jeffrey's urban poetry often explored racial issues, rebellion and the darker side of life, with its roots in New York City, not unlike his contemporary and more famous friend, Lou Reed.

Jeffreys issued his first self-titled solo album in 1973. Presented here is a rare live recording from right around that time, when Jeffreys opened for Lou Reed as was journeying out into America's heartland with the groundbreaking "Transformer" material.

Not surprisingly, this set places an emphasis on material from Jeffreys' debut album and his compelling voice, songwriting craft and natural charisma rapidly win over Reed's audience. Following the fourth song, Jeffreys is so comfortable that he veers off, treating listeners to a succession of songs not part of his standard repertoire of the time, including "James Dean," "Just Like Pavlov's Dog" and a lovely reading of "Going Back To The Ozarks," an unreleased song dating back to his Grinder's Switch era. Much of his best work was still yet to come, but this remarkable recording is a fine example of Garland Jeffreys at the dawn of his solo career.