Concert Vault

Blood, Sweat and Tears

Bottom Line (New York, NY)

Nov 9, 1977 - Early

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  1. 1 Soundcheck 02:04
  2. 2 Instrumental 06:09
  3. 3 Don't Explain 08:35
  4. 4 Lucretia MacEvil / Lucretia's Reprise 12:33
  5. 5 You've Made Me So Very Happy 12:08
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Liner Notes

David Clayton Thomas - vocals; Randy Bernsen - lead guitar; Bob Economou - drums; Larry Willis - keyboards; Neil Stubenhaus- bass; Chris Albert - trumpet, flugelhorn; Greg Herbert - sax, reeds; Tony Klatkat - trumpet; David Bargeron - trombone, tuba

At last count, Blood Sweat & Tears laid claimed to over 70 members throughout their thirty-plus career. The band is still together and performing, but lead vocalist David Clayton-Thomas (who sang on the majority of the band's radio hits) works currently under his own name and the group is now under the direction of original drummer Bobby Colomby.

This recording was taken from the 1977 Brand New Day tour, which was promoting their LP of the same name—one of the five studio albums Clayton-Thomas recorded with BS&T after returning to the band in 1975. It also celebrates the 10 year anniversary of the band, which had formed a decade earlier in 1967.

For this '77 tour, the band had replaced its last original members, Dick Halligan and Bobby Colomby. Colomby, however, was now an A&R exec at ABC Records and had signed the band. He also produced the lone record they did for the label. Despite the return of Clayton-Thomas and great promise of Brand New Day, in the end it failed to produce any radio hits. For this 40-minute set, after a soundcheck and a six-minute instrumental song, classic BS&T hits are represented, including "Lucretia MacEvil" and "Lucretia's Reprise" and an extended "You've Made Me So Very Happy," which closes out the show.

Jazz fans will love this recording for the sheer musicianship. Near the end of the second set, there are extensive keyboard, guitar, and drum solos, which show the musical prowess of the band. Clayton-Thomas comes off a bit like a lounge singer during his verbal interludes, but there is no denying his prowess as lead vocalist. Although he himself was not solely responsible for the success and longevity of Blood Sweat & Tears, one fact remains: They certainly never had a better singer over the band's long history.

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More Blood, Sweat and Tears

David Clayton Thomas - vocals; Randy Bernsen - lead guitar; Bob Economou - drums; Larry Willis - keyboards; Neil Stubenhaus- bass; Chris Albert - trumpet, flugelhorn; Greg Herbert - sax, reeds; Tony Klatkat - trumpet; David Bargeron - trombone, tuba

At last count, Blood Sweat & Tears laid claimed to over 70 members throughout their thirty-plus career. The band is still together and performing, but lead vocalist David Clayton-Thomas (who sang on the majority of the band's radio hits) works currently under his own name and the group is now under the direction of original drummer Bobby Colomby.

This recording was taken from the 1977 Brand New Day tour, which was promoting their LP of the same name—one of the five studio albums Clayton-Thomas recorded with BS&T after returning to the band in 1975. It also celebrates the 10 year anniversary of the band, which had formed a decade earlier in 1967.

For this '77 tour, the band had replaced its last original members, Dick Halligan and Bobby Colomby. Colomby, however, was now an A&R exec at ABC Records and had signed the band. He also produced the lone record they did for the label. Despite the return of Clayton-Thomas and great promise of Brand New Day, in the end it failed to produce any radio hits. For this 40-minute set, after a soundcheck and a six-minute instrumental song, classic BS&T hits are represented, including "Lucretia MacEvil" and "Lucretia's Reprise" and an extended "You've Made Me So Very Happy," which closes out the show.

Jazz fans will love this recording for the sheer musicianship. Near the end of the second set, there are extensive keyboard, guitar, and drum solos, which show the musical prowess of the band. Clayton-Thomas comes off a bit like a lounge singer during his verbal interludes, but there is no denying his prowess as lead vocalist. Although he himself was not solely responsible for the success and longevity of Blood Sweat & Tears, one fact remains: They certainly never had a better singer over the band's long history.