Concert Vault

Blondie

McFarlin Auditorium, S.M.U. (Dallas, TX)

Aug 16, 1979

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  1. 1 In The Sun 02:52
  2. 2 11:59 03:40
  3. 3 Look Good In Blue 03:07
  4. 4 Pretty Baby 04:57
  5. 5 Heart Of Glass 06:08
  6. 6 Man Overboard 05:32
  7. 7 One Way Or Another 06:38
  8. 8 Sunday Girl 03:39
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Liner Notes

Clem Burke - drums
Jimmy Destri - keyboards
Nigel Harrison - bass
Deborah Harry - vocals
Frank Infante - guitar
Chris Stein - guitars, vocals

When lead vocalist Deborah Harry was working a day job as waitress and Playboy Bunny in the late 1960s and early 1970s, she would often hear the phrase, "Hey, blondie," when the blue collar patrons she waited on were trying to get her attention. When she formed a rock band in the Bowery district of New York City in 1975, with friend and lover, guitarist Chris Stein, she decided to take the nickname she had heard so many times before and use it.

Blondie started playing the early punk and glitter rock clubs of Manhattan, which had been growing in popularity with acts like The New York Dolls and Iggy & The Stooges. Blondie soon became a favorite of venues like Max's Kansas City and CBGBs, and in 1976, was signed to the upstart indie label. Private Stock. They received strong critical response to the LP, and though sales were minimal, the band started gaining considerable stature outside of the Big Apple.

In 1977, Private Stock was bought by the successful UK-based EMI affiliate, Chrysalis Records. Chrysalis president Terry Ellis was determined to make Blondie a huge international act. The band did its part by writing and recording a series of catchy hits, that were both radio friendly and in the edgy spirit of punk music. "Hanging On The Telephone," "Heart of Glass," "One Way or Another," "Dreaming", "Sunday Girl," and "Call Me" (from the soundtrack of the film, American Gigolo), all went to the top of the charts between 1977 and 1980, establishing the group, worldwide.

By the time the '80s had arrived, Blondie was one of the biggest rock bands in the world. They easily embraced the MTV generation with Harry's good looks and a distinct ability to incorporate other musical genres such as disco, techno, and rap into their punk rock musical base. This show was recorded for a King Biscuit broadcast and is one of three captured on the band's 1979 US tour. It was recorded not long after Blondie had won the Grammy Award for best Female Rock Performance for the song "One Way or Another."

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Clem Burke - drums
Jimmy Destri - keyboards
Nigel Harrison - bass
Deborah Harry - vocals
Frank Infante - guitar
Chris Stein - guitars, vocals

When lead vocalist Deborah Harry was working a day job as waitress and Playboy Bunny in the late 1960s and early 1970s, she would often hear the phrase, "Hey, blondie," when the blue collar patrons she waited on were trying to get her attention. When she formed a rock band in the Bowery district of New York City in 1975, with friend and lover, guitarist Chris Stein, she decided to take the nickname she had heard so many times before and use it.

Blondie started playing the early punk and glitter rock clubs of Manhattan, which had been growing in popularity with acts like The New York Dolls and Iggy & The Stooges. Blondie soon became a favorite of venues like Max's Kansas City and CBGBs, and in 1976, was signed to the upstart indie label. Private Stock. They received strong critical response to the LP, and though sales were minimal, the band started gaining considerable stature outside of the Big Apple.

In 1977, Private Stock was bought by the successful UK-based EMI affiliate, Chrysalis Records. Chrysalis president Terry Ellis was determined to make Blondie a huge international act. The band did its part by writing and recording a series of catchy hits, that were both radio friendly and in the edgy spirit of punk music. "Hanging On The Telephone," "Heart of Glass," "One Way or Another," "Dreaming", "Sunday Girl," and "Call Me" (from the soundtrack of the film, American Gigolo), all went to the top of the charts between 1977 and 1980, establishing the group, worldwide.

By the time the '80s had arrived, Blondie was one of the biggest rock bands in the world. They easily embraced the MTV generation with Harry's good looks and a distinct ability to incorporate other musical genres such as disco, techno, and rap into their punk rock musical base. This show was recorded for a King Biscuit broadcast and is one of three captured on the band's 1979 US tour. It was recorded not long after Blondie had won the Grammy Award for best Female Rock Performance for the song "One Way or Another."